fullten:

dominalumina:

chauvinistsushi:

science-for-a-star:

Lip Service Badlands Cowl Hoodie Dress

(also the model is beyond gorgeous and is it just me or does she look a lot like Jasika Nicole?)

DESIRE

fullten can this be the official cult uniform?

I would seriously wear something like that… like yesterday o-o 

  • severus snape: james potter's cruelty and humiliation really scarred me for life lmfao what are you doing neville you useless piece of 11 year old shit everyone lets laugh at neville OHHH OHHH MY GOD LOOK AT THIS 11 YEAR OLD NEGLECTED PARENTLESS NERD HARRY HE THINKS HES SO GREAT AND HE JUST RUINED THE THIRD POTION HES EVER MADE LMFAO WOW james potter was so cruel he was the devil

punkbread:

when all your favorite people are online

image

(Source: deadsmondmiles)

officialwhitegirls:

primary source of income: when my mom gives me money to buy something and doesn’t ask for the change back

(Source: officialwhitegirls)

fishingboatproceeds:

peterchayward:

fishingboatproceeds:

Earlier today, I met with several students at Addis Ababa University to discuss the opportunities and challenges they face in their academic and professional lives. 

One of the biggest challenges we have here on the Internet is hearing marginalized and underrepresented voices, especially those across the digital divide. You can’t amplify voices online that aren’t online.

While all of the young people I talked to used the Internet and most had regular access via a tablet, smartphone, or laptop, none had blogs or tumblrs or YouTube channels, and none had social network interactions with people outside their IRL social networks. I’m sure there are English-language tumblrs from Ethiopian students (although I haven’t been able to find any today), but almost all voices—even highly educated and privileged ones—from the world’s poorest countries go completely unheard online.

(And when we do hear them, it’s usually through an intermediary: videos edited by someone else, transcripts of interviews, etc. It’s not direct participation in the conversation by, for instance, posting to tumblr or reblogging HIMYM gifs. [The students I spoke to agreed that HIMYM is the best American show they have on TV, although a couple said that watching TV was a waste of time and a distraction from studying, to which I said HAVE YOU SEEN PHINEAS AND FERB BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY EDUCATIONAL.])

Anyway, all of this is a long preamble to say: Earlier today I met with a 20-year-old law student who helped found an organization in Ethiopia devoted to empowering women and ending gender-based violence. (I’ll include her talking about her work in a video soon.)

The organization does fundraisers so the poorest women at the university can have access to contraception, and every year they have a Blood Drive for Mothers, where many students donate blood to combat maternal death. (Post-partum hemorrhaging is a too-common cause of death among Ethiopian women.)

We often think of global charity as people from rich countries giving money to people from poor countries. But the real story is much more complicated (and much more exciting!); we just don’t hear those stories often, because organizations like the one founded by the young woman I met don’t have YouTube videos or tumblrs.

Okay, this might be a dumb question, but…why don’t they have blogs? If they have access to the internet, surely making a Tumblr is a simple process that would directly get their voice out there?

Am I missing something obvious?

An Ethiopian nerdfighter who just got a tumblr responds:

"There’s no 3G coverage (as of yet) and mobile data is so terrible that it’s barely good enough to check your email. Watching a youtube video on a smartphone is unthinkable. Good internet access for your home is way too expensive to be affordable. You have a chance if you’re a university student because most of the universities here have free WiFi, but the hotspots are limited and you have to actively seek them out (which is what I do once or twice a week, to keep up with the world). And I don’t think most university students think it’s worth their time to REGULARLY seek WiFi hotspots so they can re blog stuff on tumblr."

My own experience is that even on the best university wifi networks, tumblr takes FOREVER to load (like several minutes for a single page), so there’s no way to load your dash (unless it’s all text) and posting usually fails. It’s just very different interacting with the Internet when your download and upload speeds are slower than dial up.

if you ever want to hear the neon genesis evangelion theme at any time just call 309-889-0497

fiendswithbenefits:

zchr:

i just set it up and it seems to be working

if you’re at the club and someone asks for your number just give them this

allanime01:

caprediem:

tassiekitty:

samwinchesterswifipassword:

seriouslyamerica:

Seriously, Rugrats was not fucking around.

People don’t give Rugrats enough credit for how progressive it was. I mean think about it.

  • Chuckie, for most of the series is raised by a single father
  • Angelica’s mother was a high ranking corporate executive
  • Phil and Lil’s mom was a feminist 
  • She also breastfed them (which the show actually depicted)
  • Tommy is half-Jewish and the show actually explored this part of his heritage

Seriously, this show was fucking amazing!! They just don’t make ‘em like this anymore….

Also don’t forget that Chuckie had an interracial family after the second movie.

How are you guys forgetting Susie? I mean her mom was a doctor and her dad was a writer for a famous Children’s TV show. Not to mention Kimmie was anything BUT submissive.

Remember when they had episodes that hit hard to issues kids might be dealing with? Chuckie only had his Dad on Mothers Day, Tommy had to deal with being outshadowed by a new baby brother, Phil and Lil were constantly being mixed up and then they had a couple episodes where they each found that even as a twin they were their own people.
Man Rugrats was the shit.

back-streets:
turdqu0ize:

keep fuckin walkin you postman piece of shit

turdqu0ize:

keep fuckin walkin you postman piece of shit

(Source: matthejew)

heathicorn:

apparently some guy named mark was trying to tell my mom he needed to speak with my dad about any financial transactions my mom was making because he was the man of the house and she did not take kindly to his implying that my dad was the primary breadwinner/person in charge in our family so

image

spn-fandom-breathing-heavily:

westbor0baptistchurch:

“But if you forget to reblog Madame Zeroni, you and your family will be cursed for always and eternity.”

image

not even risking that shit

jetgreguar:


allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

what-if-i-was-funny:

sawmuchded:

theprincessdiana:

can you paint with all the colors of the wind
image

image

alright picasso calm down

(Source: yzma)

skeletales:

Liv Tyler

skeletales:

Liv Tyler